Difference between revisions of "Grid and infrastructure"

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{{AdditionalInfoTemplate
 
{{AdditionalInfoTemplate
 
|Application=ADVANCE project; Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
 
|Application=ADVANCE project; Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
|IMAGEComponent=Energy demand;  
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|IMAGEComponent=Energy demand;
|Reference=Van Ruijven et al., 2012; Hoogwijk, 2004;  
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|Reference=Van Ruijven et al., 2012; Hoogwijk, 2004;
 
|Description=In the IMAGE model, grid and infrastructure are not systematically dealt with. Still, the influence of both factors on transitions (and in particular the rate of transitions) plays a role in the model. There are several places where grid and infrastructure are implicitly or explicitly dealt with.
 
|Description=In the IMAGE model, grid and infrastructure are not systematically dealt with. Still, the influence of both factors on transitions (and in particular the rate of transitions) plays a role in the model. There are several places where grid and infrastructure are implicitly or explicitly dealt with.
  
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* For CCS, an estimate is made by region of the distance between the most important storage sites and the production of CO2. Therefore, a region-specific and storage-option specific cost factor is added to the on-site storage costs.
 
* For CCS, an estimate is made by region of the distance between the most important storage sites and the production of CO2. Therefore, a region-specific and storage-option specific cost factor is added to the on-site storage costs.
 
* Finally, infrastructure plays in reality a key-role in the potential rate of transition: for instance, in transport electric vehicles can only be introduced at a rate that is consistent with the expansion of corresponding infrastructure to provide power. In the model, this is only implicitly described by adding an additional delay factor on top of the delay that is explicitly taken into account by the lifetime of the technology itself (in this example the electric vehicle). The additional delay factor simply consists of a smoothing function affecting the portfolio of investments. For the same reason, this smoothing of change in investments is also used elsewhere in the model.
 
* Finally, infrastructure plays in reality a key-role in the potential rate of transition: for instance, in transport electric vehicles can only be introduced at a rate that is consistent with the expansion of corresponding infrastructure to provide power. In the model, this is only implicitly described by adding an additional delay factor on top of the delay that is explicitly taken into account by the lifetime of the technology itself (in this example the electric vehicle). The additional delay factor simply consists of a smoothing function affecting the portfolio of investments. For the same reason, this smoothing of change in investments is also used elsewhere in the model.
 
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|BelongsTo=Energy demand/Description;
 
 
|BelongsTo=Energy demand;  
 
 
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Revision as of 13:57, 10 August 2015